In the news: Gambling, ‘fat’ terminology and minimum pricing for alcohol.

Date: 23/10/2017 Written by: Kelly 3 minutes to read.
News Review

There has been an increase in reports of self-harm among teenage girls, 95% of televised British football matches have been found to feature gambling adverts, and nurses have been told to change their terminology for 'obese and overweight' children. Below we've given you an overview of some of the news stories which have caught our eye over the past couple of weeks to save you the time of looking yourself!

Universal credit behind rising rent arrears and food bank use, 'guinea pig' councils say

The universal credit system is pushing poor tenants deeper into rent arrears and sending food bank referrals soaring, according to a study by two councils that have been guinea pigs for the new regime.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/oct/23/un...

 

Welsh government plans minimum pricing for alcohol sales

A new law that will introduce a minimum price for the sale of alcohol in Wales has been unveiled by the Welsh Government. The public health (minimum price for alcohol) (Wales) bill is expected to be introduced before the Welsh assembly today by the public health minister, Rebecca Evans. It will address longstanding health concerns about the effects of excessive drinking and the availability of cheap, strong alcohol. The problem is estimated to lead to 50,000 alcohol-related hospital admissions a year, costing the Welsh NHS £120m annually. In 2015 there were 463 alcohol-related deaths in Wales.

In Scotland, the Alcohol (Minimum Pricing) Act was passed in June 2012 but has not been introduced as it has been tied up in a succession of court challenges amid claims that it breaches European law.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/oct/23/we...

Did you know that we carried out research, insight and segmentation work in North Wales? Read our case study

 

'Steep rise' in self-harm among teenage girls

There has been a steep rise in reports of self-harm among girls aged 13 to 16, according to a study of data from GP practices across the UK. The BMJ study, which looked at figures from 2011-2014, said GPs could be getting better at picking up self-harm. But it was likely that rising stress and psychological problems in young people were also behind the trend. The NSPCC said giving children support early could be a matter of life or death. Since 2001, girls have had much higher rates of self-harm than boys - 37.4 per 10,000 compared with 12.3 in boys. While self-harm rates stayed constant among 10- to 12-year-olds and 17- to 19-year-olds, there was a 68% increase among 13- to 16-year-olds over the three-year period studied.

Read more http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-41671060

 

10 toughest places for girls to go to school

Figures from the United Nations suggest there has been "almost zero progress" in the past decade in tackling the lack of school places in some of the world's poorest countries. A further report examined the quality of education, and the UN said the findings were "staggering", with more than 600 million children in school but learning next to nothing.

Find out which countries are in the top ten: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-41558486

 

Gambling adverts feature in 95pc of all televised football matches, researchers find

Around 95% of televised British football matches feature at least one gambling commercial during the ad breaks, according to new figures that further highlight the close relationship between the gambling industry and sport.

Read more: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/10/23/gam...

 

Your child isn't fat, they just need a 'healthier weight status': Nurses are ordered to swap the words 'overweight and obese' for positive, friendly terminology

The parents of overweight children should not be told that they are obese, says new guidance issued to healthcare professionals. According to Public Health England (PHE), doctors and nurses should avoid using the word when discussing weight management with parents. Instead, they are encouraged to use more positive, friendly terminology such as achieving a 'healthier weight status' and a 'healthier lifestyle'.

Read More http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5005879/...

 

What are your thoughts on any of the stories we have read this week? Comment below. We would love to hear from you.

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